Non-specific code 2014 ICD-9-CM Diagnosis Code 205.1
Myeloid leukemia chronic
  • Non-Billable Code
  • There are 3 ICD-9-CM codes below 205.1 that define this diagnosis in greater detail. Do not use this code on a reimbursement claim.
Clinical Information
  • A chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by the expression of the bcr-abl1 fusion gene. It presents with neutrophilic leukocytosis. It can appear at any age, but it mostly affects middle aged and older individuals. Patients usually present with fatigue, weight loss, anemia, night sweats, and splenomegaly. If untreated, it follows a biphasic or triphasic natural course; an initial indolent chronic phase which is followed by an accelerated phase, a blast phase, or both. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation and imatinib therapy delay disease progression and prolong overall survival.
  • A slowly progressing disease in which too many white blood cells are made in the bone marrow.
  • Chronic leukemia in which myeloid progenitor cells predominate; the hallmark of cml, the philadelphia chromosome, is a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 which activates the proto- oncogene c-abl.
  • Clonal hematopoetic disorder caused by an acquired genetic defect in pluripotent stem cells. It starts in myeloid cells of the bone marrow, invades the blood and then other organs. The condition progresses from a stable, more indolent, chronic phase (leukemia, myeloid, chronic phase) lasting up to 7 years, to an advanced phase composed of an accelerated phase (leukemia, myeloid, accelerated phase) and blast crisis.
  • leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. In chronic myeloid leukemia (cml), there are too many granulocytes, a type of white blood cell.most people with cml have a gene mutation (change) called the philadelphia chromosome.sometimes cml does not cause any symptoms. If you have symptoms, they may include:
    • fatigue
    • weight loss
    • night sweats
    • fever
    • pain or a feeling of fullness below the ribs on the left side
    tests that examine the blood and bone marrow diagnose cml. Treatments include chemotherapy, stem cell transplants, infusion of donated white blood cells following stem cell transplants, surgery to remove the spleen, and biologic and targeted therapies. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. nih: national cancer institute
  • The most common chronic myeloproliferative disorder characterized by neutrophilic leukocytosis. It is associated with the philadelphia (ph) chromosome and/or the bcr/abl fusion gene. Most patients are middle-aged or elderly. Common findings at presentation include fatigue, weight loss, anemia, night sweats, and splenomegaly. The disease is bi- or triphasic; an initial indolent chronic phase is followed by an accelerated or blast phase. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is currently the only curative therapy (adapted from who 2001).
Applies To
  • Eosinophilic leukemia
  • Neutrophilic leukemia
ICD-9-CM Volume 2 Index entries containing back-references to 205.1:
  • Leukemia, leukemic (congenital) (M9800/3) 208.9
    • basophilic (M9870/3) 205.1
    • eosinophilic (M9880/3) 205.1
    • granulocytic (M9860/3) 205.9
      • acute (M9861/3) 205.0
      • aleukemic (M9864/3) 205.8
      • blastic (M9861/3) 205.0
      • chronic (M9863/3) 205.1
      • subacute (M9862/3) 205.2
      • subleukemic (M9864/3) 205.8
    • monocytic (Schilling-type) (M9890/3) 206.9
      • acute (M9891/3) 206.0
      • aleukemic (M9894/3) 206.8
      • chronic (M9893/3) 206.1
      • Naegeli-type (M9863/3) 205.1
      • subacute (M9892/3) 206.2
      • subleukemic (M9894/3) 206.8
    • monocytoid (M9890/3) 206.9
      • acute (M9891/3) 206.0
      • aleukemic (M9894/3) 206.8
      • chronic (M9893/3) 206.1
      • myelogenous (M9863/3) 205.1
      • subacute (M9892/3) 206.2
      • subleukemic (M9894/3) 206.8
    • myelocytic (M9863/3) 205.1
    • myelogenous (M9860/3) 205.9
      • acute (M9861/3) 205.0
      • aleukemic (M9864/3) 205.8
      • chronic (M9863/3) 205.1
      • monocytoid (M9863/3) 205.1
      • subacute (M9862/3) 205.2
      • subleukemic (M9864) 205.8
    • myeloid (M9860/3) 205.9
      • acute (M9861/3) 205.0
      • aleukemic (M9864/3) 205.8
      • chronic (M9863/3) 205.1
      • subacute (M9862/3) 205.2
      • subleukemic (M9864/3) 205.8
    • myelomonocytic (M9860/3) 205.9
      • acute (M9861/3) 205.0
      • chronic (M9863/3) 205.1
    • Naegeli-type monocytic (M9863/3) 205.1
    • neutrophilic (M9865/3) 205.1
  • Myelocytoma 205.1
  • Myelosis (M9860/3) (see also Leukemia, myeloid) 205.9
    • chronic (M9863/3) 205.1
  • Naegeli's
    • leukemia, monocytic (M9863/3) 205.1
ICD-9-CM codes are used in medical billing and coding to describe diseases, injuries, symptoms and conditions. ICD-9-CM 205.1 is one of thousands of ICD-9-CM codes used in healthcare. Although ICD-9-CM and CPT codes are largely numeric, they differ in that CPT codes describe medical procedures and services. Can't find a code? Start at the root of ICD-9-CM, check the 2014 ICD-9-CM Index or use the search engine at the top of this page to lookup any code.